By Jessi Strong

“The beauty of putting in decades of Bible study is that you build a Rolodex of knowledge,” says author and teacher Beth Moore. “I often look at young men and women who are just starting to have those light bulb moments and just beginning to get ravenous about the Scriptures, and it’s inspiring. I REMEMBER FEELING THAT I COULD NEVER GET ENOUGH OF GOD’S WORD. I’D SLAP MY DESK   

CONSTANTLY, THINKING, ‘THIS IS THE MOST THRILLING THING I’VE EVER SEEN.’ NOW, 30 YEARS IN, I’LL SEE A WORD OR A PHRASE IN SCRIPTURE THAT IMMEDIATELY BRINGS TO MIND A CONNECTION ELSEWHERE IN THE BIBLE. IT’S FUN TO BE A PART OF THAT.”

Living Proof Ministries, the organization Moore founded to teach women to love God’s Word, recently celebrated its 20th year. But even as she begins her third  decade of ministry, Moore continues to refer to herself as a student of the Word: “I love to approach my study of Scripture as someone sitting under a teacher. I’m a teacher who continually loves to be taught.”


The South Asian peninsula (or Indian subcontinent) is one of the most religiously conflicted and densely populated parts of the world. Dominated by India, the peninsula also includes Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar, and parts of Pakistan. While less than 3 percent of the population in India identify as Christian, according to official census data, the Indian church is growing at an enormous pace.

Moses gives the Israelites five books’ worth of law. The prophets tell the people to change their ways. Paul dishes out instructions to the early local churches. But when it comes to the Bible’s authors, nobody is bossier than James.